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Pickled Deviled Eggs

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Pickled Deviled Eggs are pretty in pink. Just one easy extra step and you add a beautiful rosy color to your deviled eggs!

Pickled Deviled Eggs Closeup

Deviled eggs are definitely an all-time favorite for my family. But do you ever wonder what you could do to make them a little more special?

Pickling the egg after it is cooked, but before cutting and stuffing them is so very easy! Just place the cooked, cooled, and peeled eggs in a glass container, like an oversized mason jar, and cover the eggs with the beet tinted pickling liquid. Make sure the eggs are fully submerged and that they are not too crowded. If an egg is tightly next to another, the lovely pickling solution will not tint the eggs where they are touching. I also found that putting a ramekin, bowl, or small glass, or plate on top of the eggs in the pickling liquid helps keep them submerged.

After a bath in the pink pickling solution, the eggs are halved and the yolks are removed. The deviled egg filling from the yolks is then made simply with mayo, sweet pickled relish, and seasonings. It is the dry mustard that makes these eggs devilishly good!

You can use a piping bag with a large star tip to fill the pink tinted whites with the deviled egg filling. I like that it makes the deviled eggs look a little fancy and it is a very quick way to fill the eggs. But you can also use a teaspoon, which also works really well and with the sprinkling of a few finely cut chives, your Pickled Deviled Eggs will look just as beautiful!

Pickled Deviled Eggs on Plate
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4 from 4 votes

Pickled Deviled Eggs

Encharted Cook | Jan Nunes
Pickled Deviled Eggs are pretty in pink. Just one easy extra step and you add a beautiful rosy color to your deviled eggs!
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time15 mins
Total Time45 mins
Course: Appetizer
Servings: 12
(Tap or Hover to Scale Servings)

Ingredients

  • 6 Large Eggs
  • 1 Cup Beet Juice, From Canned Beets or Squeezed from Cooked, Shredded Beets
  • 1 Cup White Vinegar
  • ½ Cup Sugar
  • 1 Teaspoon Salt
  • 4 Whole Cloves
  • ½ Teaspoon Dry Mustard, Coleman’s is my favorite brand
  • ¼ Teaspoon Salt
  • 2 Teaspoons Sweet Pickle Relish, Well Drained
  • 2 to 3 Tablespoons Mayonnaise
  • 2 Teaspoons Finely Cut Chives for Garnish

Instructions

Pickling Solution:

  • In a medium sauce pan mix together the beet juice, white vinegar, sugar, salt, and whole cloves. Bring to a simmer stirring occasionally. When sugar is dissolved, turn off heat and allow to cool.

Cook Eggs:

  • Place eggs in a large saucepan, cover with cold water, and bring to a full boil over medium high heat. Turn off heat and cover pan with a lid. Let eggs sit in hot water for 10 minutes. Drain eggs and rinse well with cold water. Cover eggs with cold water and allow eggs to cool for about 15 minutes. Peel eggs.
  • Place whole, peeled, eggs in a glass jar or bowl. Pour pickling solution over eggs. If eggs float, add a plate or ramekin to the container to weight the eggs down into the pickling solution. Cover tightly and refrigerate up to 24 hours.

Fill Eggs:

  • Drain eggs and rinse well. Cut eggs in half lengthwise and remove yolks.
  • Place yolks in a small bowl. Mash yolks with a fork and add the dry mustard, salt, and pickle relish. Add 2 tablespoons of mayonnaise and mix well. Continue to add mayonnaise one teaspoon at a time, until mixture is moist but still stiff. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed.
  • Spoon or pipe yolk mixture into each half egg. Plate eggs and garnish with cut chives.

Recipe Notes

•  The liquid from canned beets will have a lighter color than liquid squeezed from cooked shredded beets.
•  Pickled flavor increases and deeper pink color occurs, the longer the eggs are in the pickling solution.
•  The eggs in the picture were steeped for 12 hours.
•  The dry mustard is the spice that “devils” these eggs. If you find it too strong to your taste, reduce the ½ teaspoon to ¼ teaspoon. Prepared Dijon mustard can also be substituted for the dry mustard. Add ¼ teaspoon at a time until the taste is to your liking.
•  Eggs that are too crowded or pressed against the sides of the container while pickling may form white spots. A larger container is always best.
•  If eggs roll to their sides on a flat plate, remove a very narrow slice of egg white from the bottom of each egg.

Nutrition

Calories: 37kcal | Carbohydrates: 1g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 2g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 82mg | Sodium: 281mg | Potassium: 30mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 136IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 14mg | Iron: 1mg
All nutritional information on this site is an estimate. Your results may vary.
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Want to know more?

For even more information on this recipe and how it came to be, be sure to check out this post “Got Eggs?”

Pickled Deviled Eggs are pretty in pink. Just one easy extra step and you add a beautiful rosy color to your deviled eggs!

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